Photography of Angela Sairaf from Spain

About : My relationship with photography is directly influenced by my father. From a very young age, I loved to go out with him to photograph and I always asked him to give me the camera so I could peer through the viewfinder. When I was six years old he bought a new camera, an Olympus, and gave me his old Ricoh. I loved the gift. When I was 18 I started working as a photographer and for more than 15 years I photographed for several magazines in Brazil. I also worked in Japan for a modeling agency and now I’m living in Spain, where I did a Masters in contemporary photography and a PhD in Techniques and processes in imaging. I like this feeling that photography is a constant learning experience that never ends.

Statement, etc. : I love dealing with the unforeseen, the unexpected and the improvisation, so my creative processes have a lot to do with letting me be surprised by what I find on the way. I usually say that I don’t capture images, they are the ones that capture me. I really like to walk aimlessly and many of my projects come from these wanderings. About the equipment, I’m not faithful to brands, I have worked with Nikon, Hasselblad and lately I have worked with a Canon 5D Mark II, a Canon G1x or even with my iPhone. The best equipment, for me, is whatever you have in your hands in the moment you want to take a photograph.

Project – The secret life of Tapuicacas : Tapuicacas are closer than you think. They are everywhere, especially in artistic environments. Their lives are top-secret and they never reveal their true identity. I am lucky enough that some of them agreed to be photographed by me, which is truly an honour. In this series, I have portrayed the Tapuicacas in different situations all over the world. This series is a humorous criticism of aesthetic repetition.

What inspired me to create the project was the observation that photographers around the world have long been photographing people with some object covering their faces. If you observe the material published in books, magazines or photography blogs, exhibitions, festivals, you will find a lot of photos like this of the most varied authors. To hide the faces of the protagonists with any object is an aesthetic standard widely echoed by photographers around the world, and despite the lack of novelty, it is very well accepted by photography lovers in general.

One day I thought that all these characters with their faces hidden could belong to a single tribe. Then I created the name Tapuicacas and I started to call them that way. I decided to make my series with people from many different places hiding their faces with a mask –which is also an aesthetic repetition. The series was published in many photography magazines and blogs, as well as exhibited in some galleries and art and photography festivals such as Paraty em Foco (Brazil), Budapest Photo Festival (Hungary), Indian Photography Festival Hyderabad, Guimarães Noc Noc (Portugal), among others. Every time I go to an exhibition or see some photography book or magazine where I find some of these photos with people with their faces hidden I always think: Wow, another Tapuicaca! Tapuicacas again! Tapuicacas everywhere! I see them almost everyday.

Some pictures of the series are available to purchase at TOBE Gallery.

Influences and favorite stuff : I have many references in photography, and I think everything I know and have experienced in my life influences me in some way. I have multiple interests and this is reflected in my work. My friends often say I’m a box of surprises.

Angela Sairaf : Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

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